Hiking in Pinnacle Peak Park

Discover the beauty and secrets of the desert landscape on the trail at Pinnacle Peak near Scottsdale, Arizona.

Jul 25, 2009
  • Enjoy spectacular views of the stars—and the evening landscape.
  • Cacti bloom in the desert.
  • Biking is an excellent way to experience the desert.
  • Pinnacle Peak boasts a rugged beauty.
  • A couple takes a guided hike in the desert.
1/5
Enjoy spectacular views of the stars—and the evening landscape.
Photography Barbara Kraft
2/5
Cacti bloom in the desert.
Photography Lonna Tucker
3/5
Biking is an excellent way to experience the desert.
Photography John C. Russell
4/5
Pinnacle Peak boasts a rugged beauty.
Photography courtesy Pinnacle Peak
5/5
A couple takes a guided hike in the desert.
Photography John C. Russell

Hiking Pinnacle Peak in Scottsdale, Arizona, is as close as I’ve ever gotten to entering a real-world cartoon landscape: The cacti were multi-armed monsters; the boulders defied gravity, perched on pinnacles at crazy tilts; and as the sun came up, the desert blazed with crimson, ginger and putty. Everything seemed so exaggerated and peculiar, at least to my lake-and-pine-forest Canadian sensibility. From the highest point of the trail, my companions and I caught our breath and surveyed the valley below. We saw protected desert with a forest of cacti, a golf course and some houses, and in the distance the undulating hazy-blue silhouette of iconic Camelback Mountain.

The trailhead of Pinnacle Peak Park is a 10-minute walk from Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North. It’s a moderately challenging 2.8-kilometre track that takes about 90-minutes roundtrip. Along the way, markers flag some of the flora of the Sonoran Desert. Banana yucca. Desert ironwood. Succulent ocotillo.

Things we learned:
• Cholla cactus bites (sort of).
• Snakes don’t come out when it’s cold.
• Saguaro cactus starts its life sheltered under the leaves of other plants.
• The Concierge was right to insist we take an extra bottle of water despite the cool morning.

The trail is free and the Concierge can provide a map. But you might want to sign up for one of the new Desert Preservation hikes. Working with the city of Scottsdale, Four Seasons can arrange a two-hour hike with a park interpreter. When you’re done, you’ll plant a cactus in the park—a baby saguaro, perhaps, or a prickly pear.
It’ll be your small contribution in helping this bizarre and fascinating landscape stay surreal.

For information, contact the Resort Concierge.


Tags:


One Comment about Hiking in Pinnacle Peak Park

  1. Christino says:

    In the Pinnacles Desert, right in the heart of Nambung National Park, thousands of huge limestone pillars rise out of a stark landscape of yellow sand.
    http://www.travelworth.com/the-pinnacles.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Today's Top 5

Four Seasons Magazine

British period architecture illustration

The best of luxury travel, style and culture from thought leaders and tastemakers

Issue 4 2014