Four Seasons at 50

  • “Aboreta are not just pretty places,” says Dr. Christopher Dunn, director of the Harold L. Lyon Arboretum in Honolulu, Hawaii. “We have active conservation programs throughout the country and throughout the world to address environmental and human-caused issues that affect the natural landscape.”
  • Landscape designer Frederick Law Olmsted thought parks should not be stand-alone jewels but part of connected, linear networks he called “parkways.” The only Olmsted-designed parkway still in existence is Boston’s “Emerald Necklace,” which connects downtown Boston with nearby Dorchester by way of a 7-mile, undulating series of gardens, ponds, fens and commons. It also includes the Arnold Arboretum, the oldest continuously public arboretum in North America.
  • The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh showcases extraordinary, non-native plants in part to educate the public about the importance of conservation, especially when concerns about environmental degradation and the potential impact on the world’s ecosystems loom large.
  • Many arboreta including the Harold L. Lyon Arboretum are scientific powerhouses affiliated with large universities or with strong research programs on their own. At a local level, they work to monitor potential threats from diseases, pests and invasive species, and educate the public about what is best to plant in their own gardens.
  • Portugal’s Parques de Sintra near Lisbon includes a Moorish castle, gardens and a tree collection featuring such magnificent giants as Thuja plicata (western red cedar), Cryptomeria japonica (Japanese cedar) and Sequoia sempervirens (coast redwood).
  • Olmsted preferred the term “park experience” to “park” when talking about his landscape designs. Whatever can he have meant? Visit an arboretum––and with more than 500 around the world, the opportunities are virtually endless––and you may come to this understanding.
  • Arboreta such as the Arnold Arboretum in Boston are living museums and often act as safe-keepers of rare trees.
  • Kathleen Taylor, president and CEO of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts—the logo for which is a tree—says the company will launch a long-term, worldwide commitment to trees. “Preserving and protecting the planet has always been part of the Four Seasons mission.” Learn more about this tree-planting initiative.
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“Aboreta are not just pretty places,” says Dr. Christopher Dunn, director of the Harold L. Lyon Arboretum in Honolulu, Hawaii. “We have active conservation programs throughout the country and throughout the world to address environmental and human-caused issues that affect the natural landscape.”
2/8
Landscape designer Frederick Law Olmsted thought parks should not be stand-alone jewels but part of connected, linear networks he called “parkways.” The only Olmsted-designed parkway still in existence is Boston’s “Emerald Necklace,” which connects downtown Boston with nearby Dorchester by way of a 7-mile, undulating series of gardens, ponds, fens and commons. It also includes the Arnold Arboretum, the oldest continuously public arboretum in North America.
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The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh showcases extraordinary, non-native plants in part to educate the public about the importance of conservation, especially when concerns about environmental degradation and the potential impact on the world’s ecosystems loom large.
4/8
Many arboreta including the Harold L. Lyon Arboretum are scientific powerhouses affiliated with large universities or with strong research programs on their own. At a local level, they work to monitor potential threats from diseases, pests and invasive species, and educate the public about what is best to plant in their own gardens.
5/8
Portugal’s Parques de Sintra near Lisbon includes a Moorish castle, gardens and a tree collection featuring such magnificent giants as Thuja plicata (western red cedar), Cryptomeria japonica (Japanese cedar) and Sequoia sempervirens (coast redwood).
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Olmsted preferred the term “park experience” to “park” when talking about his landscape designs. Whatever can he have meant? Visit an arboretum––and with more than 500 around the world, the opportunities are virtually endless––and you may come to this understanding.
7/8
Arboreta such as the Arnold Arboretum in Boston are living museums and often act as safe-keepers of rare trees.
8/8
Kathleen Taylor, president and CEO of Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts—the logo for which is a tree—says the company will launch a long-term, worldwide commitment to trees. “Preserving and protecting the planet has always been part of the Four Seasons mission.” Learn more about this tree-planting initiative.

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Four Seasons celebrates its 50th birthday with a long-term, worldwide commitment to the environment. Learn more about our global commitment to Supporting Sustainability, Advancing Cancer Research and Building Communities here and at our dedicated web site, livingvalues.fourseasons.com.

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