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Touring Bali’s Temples

November 10, 2012
  • Statue inside the Pura Puseh Temple, Batuan, Bali
  • Temple entrance in Bali
  • Temple detail, Bali
  • Pura Puseh Temple, Batuan, Bali
  • Entrance of Pura Puseh, Bali
  • Pavilion inside Pura Puseh, Bali
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Balinese people often greet each other with their palms touching in prayer position. This statue welcomed me at the Pura Puseh Temple in Batuan.
Photography Rachelle Lucas
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This temple is attached to the sandstone factory I visited in Batubulan.
Photography Rachelle Lucas
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Ornate carvings and stone figures adorn the walls at Pura Puseh Temple.
Photography Rachelle Lucas
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At Pura Puseh, I was instructed to cover my shorts with this colourful sarong.
Photography Rachelle Lucas
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The figures of Nandiswara and Mahakala offer spiritual protection to those entering the temple.
Photography Rachelle Lucas
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This ornate pavilion sits inside Pura Puseh.
Photography Rachelle Lucas

After a morning of seeing the many handicrafts that Bali produces, my guide Dewa and I decided to shift gears and explore the island’s spiritual side with a visit to the Pura Puseh Temple in Batuan.

I had already seen a few smaller temples attached to homes and shops, including one at the sandstone factory in the village of Batubulan. They all seemed to have one thing in common: the protective Hindu god Bhoma who sits atop the entrances, smiling down at visitors.

At Pura Puseh, though, I was instructed to wrap a sarong around my shorts to show reverence for this historically sacred space.

With my sarong properly secured, I entered between two tall towers, each adorned with carved stone figures of Nandiswara and Mahakala. These figures, Dewa told me, offer spiritual protection. Ornate carvings embellished the walls, and various pavilions stood within the serene temple grounds. Some of these pavilions are simply used for storage, while others host ritual dances and ceremonies. Carved elephants positioned at the base of most of the temple’s pillars symbolise the strength and stability needed to bear the monument above it.

I also learned that the colours within the temple have meaning. The black-and-white-chequered cloths displayed throughout represent the balance of good and bad, positive and negative, yin and yang. Personally, I felt nothing but a sense of peace at this sacred site. Way more yang than yin.


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Rachelle Lucas

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Rachelle, a travel writer and videographer, would love your advice on what to see, do and eat during her trip. Help plan her journey Around the World by following @TravelBlggr on Twitter

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